HS – The Civilian Conservation Corps in Connecticut

by Edward Dorgan
Lewis S. Mills High School, Burlington


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Environment, Work
Theme
The Role of Connecticut in U.S. History
Town
Statewide
Related Search Terms
Civilian Conservation Corps, Roosevelt’s Tree Army, Great Depression
Social Studies Frameworks
High School – United States History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

How did the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) impact Connecticut?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • What was the purpose of the CCC?
  • Where were CCC camps built in Connecticut?
  • What types of work did the CCC workers do?
  • How did the CCC program change the lives of Connecticut’s “CCC boys”?
  • What are the lasting results (the legacy) from the CCC program in Connecticut?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

A map of CCC camps in Connecticut during the Great Depression. The color of the map pins denotes the year the camps were opened: Blue – 1933, Orange – 1935. Also, some of the pins include photographs showing the CCC boys and examples of the work they completed as part of this New Deal program.

pageIn addition, you can download a  list of all 20 of the CCC camps in Connecticut– their locations, when they were built, when they closed, and the names of the state parks or forests today.

connecticut-map

Physical map of Connecticut (includes locations of state’s major cities).

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

The activity follows a study of FDR’s first 100 days in office and the passage of a number of New Deal programs by the U.S. Congress.

  1. Students study the map of the CCC camps in Connecticut established in the 1930s and examine a physical map of the state to determine the significance (if any) of the location of the camps.
  2. Next, students will examine photographs of some CCC camps in Connecticut and of “CCC boys” in the 1930s. For help guiding students in the examination of photographs, use the Library of Congress’s Teacher’s Guide for Analyzing Photographs & Prints.
  3. Using the maps, photographs, and additional primary and secondary materials available online (see suggestions below), students will answer supporting and compelling questions about the role and impact of the CCC program in Connecticut.
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

Option 1: Students will create a CCC recruitment poster for young men in Connecticut at the time of the Great Depression.

Option 2: Students will compose a letter to their state representative reflecting on the accomplishments of the CCC programs in Connecticut and advocating for the creation of modern day CCC programs to reduce unemployment for today’s young adults in our state.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Places to GO
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT

Grade 3 – Connecticut Whaling and Maritime History


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Business & Industry
Theme
Using Evidence to Learn About the Past
Town
Mystic, a village in the towns of Groton and Stonington, New London, Norwich, Stamford
Related Search Terms
Whaling, Natural Resources, Mystic Seaport
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3
– Connecticut & Local History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

How have Connecticut’s maritime products and industries contributed to the history of America?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • How have Connecticut’s natural resources influenced the development of our state and its contribution to American history?
  • How did industries such as whaling, manufacturing, and technology create Connecticut’s history and contribute to America’s story?
  • Historically, what goods made in Connecticut have we traded elsewhere?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

right whale 1
Cutting in a right whale: View 1 – Mystic Seaport for Educators
right whale 2
Cutting in a right whale: View 2 -The Cutting In Stage – Mystic Seaport for Educators
right whale 3
Cutting in a right whale: View 3 – Hoisting the Head Mystic Seaport for Educators

This series of photographs were taken in 1903. They document the harvesting, cutting, and hoisting aboard of parts of a right whale onto the whaling bark the California. From these photographs we see the importance of the ship and the sailors as valuable resources in the whaling process, as well as the whale oil and baleen being harvested.

Shipping, shipbuilding, and whaling play a large role in New England and Connecticut history, helping to spark the Industrial Revolution in New England.

New Bedford became known as “The City That Lit the World,” and New London was the third-largest whale oil port in the United States. The whaling industry also depopulated whales in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

In small groups, ask students to closely examine the series of three pictures and discuss:

  • What is happening in the photographs?
  • How can they tell? What do they see? Where is the evidence?

The pictures are a series showing a right whale being taken from the Atlantic Ocean and harvested for its resources.

Have students in groups discuss and research as necessary:

  • What is being gained from this harvest?
  • What are the valuable resources in the pictures?
  • What effect do these Connecticut sailors and the whaling industry have on the rest of the country?
  • How did Connecticut’s contribution to the whaling industry affect the way the world viewed America at the time?
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

In groups, have students design a new flag for the state of Connecticut to reflect our maritime history, and present their new flag to the class explaining and justifying each of the elements they included on the flag.

  • Identify each symbol or design included on the flag.
  • What is the significance of each element?
  • Why did they choose to include these particular symbols?
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ

Grade 3 – Account Book of James Stewart’s General Store

by Gigi Liverant 
Colchester Historical Society, Colchester


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Business & Industry, Everyday Life
Theme
Using Evidence to Learn About the Past
Town
Colchester, Statewide
Related Search Terms
Primary Source, James Stewart, Colchester, Colonist, Bulkeley, Caleb Pendleton, Reverend M. Worthington, Colonial, Everyday Life, Trade
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3 – Connecticut & Local History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

How do we trade goods and services?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • How do we get things we need to live?
  • What resources were available in Colchester?
  • How was colonial life different/similar to life now?
  • How does Colchester contribute to Connecticut’s story?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

A sampler of pages from the account book of James Stewart’s general store located in Colchester, Connecticut, 1740 and continues through 1769.

DavidFoote
Ledger page 42, dated 1740, Account of “David Foot of Colchester”, also “Seth Wetmore of Middletown.” Items entered on ledger page include; “Sundrys”, “Silk Hanky”, and “Cash paid him at Hartford page” – Colchester Historical Society
FreedomChamberlain

Ledger page 31, dated 1740. Account of “Freedom Chamberlain of Colchester” indicating the purchase of “brimstone”, “knitting needles”, “beaver hat”, “broom”, “2 knives & forks” and “22 apple trees” – Colchester Historical Society
D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Using close-reading of the documents, have students generate a list of items one would purchase at James Stewart’s general store. Have the list shared among the students as each page contains different items.

  • How did people get to the general store?
  • What is the difference between these lists and their family shopping list?
  • What kind of currency are they using?
  • What are “sundry?”
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

Determine the differences between the credit and barter accounts. Ask students to give modern-day examples of credit and bartering in daily life. Where in their school do they make decisions like this?

Have a class simulation where students are given different “commodities” to trade or barter. Have four students sit out and each of these students represent a town commodity, such as, beaver hats, jack knives, sewing silk, or cotton handkerchiefs. One person can be the store owner. What would they trade or barter to get these new products? How would the store owner acquire new products?

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ