Grade 8 – Myron D. Webster Civil War Haversack

by Joe Milositz, Robyn Proto, Carrie Evans
Six to Six Interdistrict Magnet School, Bridgeport


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Civil War
Theme
The Role of Connecticut in U.S. History
Town
Woodstock, Statewide

Related Search Terms

Haversack, Broadside, Artifacts, War, Soldier, Solider’s Life, Homefront, Union, Civilians, Daily Life, American Civil War, Civil War Knapsack

Social Studies Frameworks

Grade 8 – United States History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

How does an entire society participate in war? 

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • What are the needs of soldiers during war?
  • Who provides supplies to meet soldiers’ needs?
  • How did civilians participate in the war effort?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

Myron D. Webster's gear fro his service in the Civil War - Connecticut Historical Society
Myron D. Webster’s gear from his service in the Civil War – Connecticut Historical Society

The Myron D. Webster collection is an example of a typical Civil War soldier’s gear. It includes personal belongings which include military-issued items and things he brought from home.

 

Broadside: Blankets Are Wanted  for the Army!, ca. 1860 - 1869 - Connecticut Historical Society
Broadside: Blankets Are Wanted for the Army!, ca. 1860 – 1869 – Connecticut Historical Society

The Starr broadside solicits blankets from the home front to be used by Union soldiers and shows the need for civilian support during the war.

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Students should examine artifacts belonging to Myron D. Webster from the Connecticut Historical Society.

  • What are the different items in the picture?
  • Who might use these items?
  • When might the items have been used?
  • What were the items used for?
  • Based on these artifacts, what were the needs of a solider during the Civil War?
  • Where did the items come from and how do you know?

Students will read the broadside and answer the following questions.

  • Who wrote this?
  • Who are they writing to?
  • After examining the broadside, what does this artifact tell you about what was expected of the civilian population during the Civil War?
  • What is the relationship between civilians and the military today, and how have their roles changed or stayed the same?
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

Students will share their specific evidence in response to the compelling question.

Have students research and identify the needs of soldiers today.

  • Students will organize a supply drive.
  • Students will create an advertisement for supplies for soldiers (i.e.: PSA, broadside, social media, etc)
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ

Grade 8 – The Inventions of A. A. Hotchkiss And Sons

by Rosemary Davis
Sharon Historical Society, Sharon


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Business & Industry, Invention & Technology, Civil War
Theme
The Role of Connecticut in U.S. History
Town
Sharon, Statewide
Related Search Terms
Manufacturing, Industrialization, Hardware, Firearms, Munitions, Projectiles
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 8 – United States History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

How did Sharon, Connecticut, manufacturers A. A. Hotchkiss and Sons contribute to major innovations in U.S. history?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • What inventions patented by the Hotchkiss family were used throughout the United States?
  • What industries existed in Sharon, Connecticut, that made it a good place to manufacturer hardware such as home and farm items?
  • What major war in U.S. history used a Hotchkiss invention and led to the Hotchkiss factory moving out of Sharon, Connecticut? Why was it necessary to leave Sharon?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

Items made in Asahel Hotchkiss' factory east of Mudge Pond brook. Among the included are currycombs, a horse bit, hasp, mowing machine teeth, nails, bolts, nuts and an ox bow pin. How many can you identify? - Sharon Historical Society
Items made in Asahel Hotchkiss’ factory east of Mudge Pond brook. Among the included are currycombs, a horse bit, hasp, mowing machine teeth, nails, bolts, nuts and an ox bow pin. How many can you identify? – Sharon Historical Society
Classic wrench invented by Andrew Hotchkiss.  Patented under # 8922 Andrew's design has served as the prototype for numerous adjustable wrenches - Sharon Historical Society
Classic wrench invented by Andrew Hotchkiss. Patented under # 8922 Andrew’s design has served as the prototype for numerous adjustable wrenches. – Sharon Historical Society
Hotchkiss exploding shells patented by Andrew Hotchkiss.   - Sharon Historical Society
Hotchkiss exploding shells patented by Andrew Hotchkiss. – Sharon Historical Society
D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Students can examine the Hotchkiss inventions in the context of more in-depth questions, such as:

  • Is America a land of political, economic, and social opportunity?
  • What was the significance of Connecticut’s contribution to America’s story?

Students can also use the inventions and the larger story of the Hotchkiss company moving from Sharon to analyze reasons for economic growth in Connecticut in the 19th century and ways that Connecticut contributed to the growth and expansion of the nation. Evaluate the history of individual cities and towns in the 19th century and analyze reasons for economic and/or social change in individual towns during this period.

D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

Students could engage in a debate about the role of innovation in war time. Students could also create a presentation examining the Hotchkiss inventions from geographical (Why was Sharon a good place for innovation?), social (How did farm and home hardware improve everyday life?), and political (What was the contribution of the Hotchkiss shell to the Civil War?) perspectives.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ

Grade 8 – Abolition and African Americans in Connecticut

Nancy Toney

by ConnecticutHistory.org


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Slavery & Abolition
Civil War
Theme
The Struggle for Freedom, Equality, and Social Justice
Town
Statewide
Related Search Terms
Reconstruction
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 8 – United States History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

In what way did the abolition of slavery indicate progress, or decline, for the lives of African Americans?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • What were the causes and effects of the abolition of slavery?
  • What role did Connecticut play in the abolitionist movement?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

Attributed to Osbert Burr Loomis, Nancy Toney, oil on canvas, ca. 1862 - Photograph from the collection of the Loomis Chaffee School Archives, Loomis Chaffee School, Windsor, Connecticut This painting of Nancy Toney is attributed to Osbert Burr Loomis, oil on canvas, ca. 1862 – Photograph from the collection of the Loomis Chaffee School Archives, Loomis Chaffee School, Windsor, Connecticut
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Map from the Underground Railroad in Connecticut by Horatio Strother, 1962 Map of the Underground Railroad routes in Connecticut from the book Underground Railroad in Connecticut by Horatio Strother, 1962
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way2 Article describing Frederick Douglass’s speech to 29th and 30th Colored Volunteers, page 9, The Connecticut War Record, New Haven, February 1864 – Connecticut State Library, Newspapers of Connecticut
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D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Divide students into small groups of three or four people. Choose one student to be the notetaker and write down their group’s thoughts and observations.

Using the three primary sources, students will answer the following questions:

  1. What role did Connecticut play in the abolitionist movement?
  2. What can you determine about slavery in Connecticut by examining the following sources?
  3. What is the author communicating about slavery in Connecticut?

Discuss observations with groups and with the class.

Have the students find commonalities and differences.

Share ideas about what the sources reveal.

Share answers/perspectives with the class.

D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

Students can address their responses to the compelling question(s) using a variety of different formats, including (but not limited to): An essay, a poster, or presentation.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Places to GO
Websites to VISIT