Grade 3 – Connecticut Heroes of World War I


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Health and Medicine, Social Movements, WomenWorld War I
Theme
Using Evidence to Learn About the Past
Town
Hartford,
New Haven,
Wallingford, Washington
Related Search Terms
World War One, World War I, WWI, Great War, Home Front, Hero, Nurse, Flying Ace, Pilot, Stubby, Dog, Soldier, Monument, Memorial, Biography, Non-fiction, How Connecticut Fought the War, How Lives Changed, How We Documented the War, How We Moved On
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3 – Connecticut & Local History

Historical Background
What makes someone a hero? How do we remember people who have made important contributions to our communities, our state, and our nation? What can you do to make a contribution? This activity explores these questions through the lens of five World War I “heroes” from Connecticut—four human and one canine! The heroes featured are:
Raoul Lufbery, Flying Ace
Ruth Hovey, Nurse
William Service Bell, Corporal, U.S. Army Engineers
Stubby, Mascot of the 102nd Infantry
Edith Rossiter, War Relief Volunteer

D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

What is the significance of Connecticut’s contribution to America’s story?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • What role have Connecticut people played in major events in American (or world) history?
  • What has Connecticut’s contribution to the nation been during wartime?
  • What makes someone a “hero”?
  • What characteristics do heroes have in common?
  • How do we remember people who have made contributions to our community, our state, or our nation?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY
  1. Start with a class discussion:
    • What makes someone a “hero”?
    • What characteristics do heroes have in common?
    • Who are heroes in our community, state, or nation today?
    • Record students’ responses to these questions.
  2. Explain that you will be looking at five individuals who lived in Connecticut about 100 years ago, around the time of World War I.
  3. Give students time to examine each of the portraits from the toolkit. You may look at them all on one day or break them up, studying a different individual (portrait and biography) each day. Ask students what they:
    OBSERVE—“what details can you notice about each portrait?”
    REFLECT—“what do you think about the individual based on what you see?” QUESTION—“what does this picture make you wonder?” Remind students of your initial discussion and ask, “Based on what you see, do you think this is a hero? Why or why not?”
  4. Distribute the mini-biographies. Again, you may want to break them up, studying a different individual each day. As students read, ask them to circle, underline, or highlight words or phrases that they think describe a “hero.”
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS
  • Students will use the “Connecticut Heroes of World War I” chart in the toolkit to organize their information about the individuals studied and indicate whether or not they feel each one qualifies as a “hero.”
  • Students will complete a graphic organizer of your choice (Venn diagram, double bubble, etc.) comparing and contrasting two or more of the individuals studied.
  • Students will select one of the individuals studied that they feel qualifies as a hero and design a monument to that person (or dog.)
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Places to GO
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles & Books to READ

This TeachITCT.org activity is sponsored in part by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Eastern Region Program, coordinated by Waynesburg University.

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Grade 3 – Kids in Connecticut History: Image Analysis Skill-Builder

Lovely St. School, Avon, 1912

TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Education, Everyday Life
Theme
Using Evidence to Learn About the Past
Town
Avon, Burlington, Fairfield, Hartford, Manchester, Statewide
Related Search Terms
Kids, Children, Child Labor, School, Transportation, Toys
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3 – Connecticut & Local History

Historical Background
This activity explores history through the lens of childhood, using images from around 1890-1920. Although Connecticut passed an “Act for Educating Children” in 1650, enforcement of schooling was inconsistent over the next 250 years. Many children—some of them as young as 3rd graders—left school to work, and it wasn’t until 1900 that the state set a minimum age of 14 for children to work in non-agricultural jobs. Comparing their own experiences to these images of school, work, transportation, recreation, and formal portraiture is a great way to give young students practice in analyzing primary sources and developing lines of inquiry.

D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

In what ways have the lives of children in Connecticut changed or stayed the same over time?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • How would my life have been different if I grew up in Connecticut 100 years ago?
  • What can pictures from the time tell us about the past?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

Choose one or more of the following photographs to use in this activity.

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

This activity can be done all in one session, using one or more photographs from the toolkit, or it can be introduced on one day and then revisited as “mini-lessons” over several days, weeks, or months, using a different photograph each time.

1)     Select a photograph from the toolkit to model the activity with students.

2)     Use the Library of Congress’s Primary Source Analysis process (download pdf) to explore the sample photograph together as a group. Ask students to OBSERVE/LOOK, REFLECT/THINK, and QUESTION/WONDER.

OBSERVE/LOOK: What do you see? What is the setting? What people or things are in the image? What details do you notice?

REFLECT/THINK: What do you think is going on here? Who do you think took this picture and why? Are there clues about when this picture was taken? If this picture was taken today, how would it be different?

QUESTION/WONDER: What does this picture make you wonder? How could you find out more?

3)     Choose if you wish to continue working with other photographs together as a group (on the same day or in the future) or distribute printouts of different photographs to pairs or teams of students for small-group work, which can then be shared.

4)     At the end of each session, revisit the supporting and compelling questions, as well as additional questions that the class has developed together.

D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS
  • Students will create a double bubble or Venn Diagram comparing their lives today with the lives of children 100 years ago.
  • Using one of the photographs from the toolkit as a starting point, students will write a diary entry or letter from the perspective of a child in the photograph.
  • Students will bring photos from home or take new photos that align to the themes in the historic photos explored (school, transportation, work/chores, having fun/recreation, and formal portraiture.) Using these photos and printouts of the historic images, they will create a bulletin board display or mural highlighting similarities and differences between their lives and those of children in Connecticut 100 years ago.
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Places to GO
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ

This TeachITCT.org activity is sponsored in part by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Eastern Region Program, coordinated by Waynesburg University.

Grade 3 – Exploring Communities: Using Historic Maps to Learn about the Past


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Architecture, Environment, The State
Theme
Using Evidence to Learn About the Past
Town
Bridgeport, Canton, Danbury, East Haddam, Hartford, Killingly, Madison, New Haven, New London, NorwichThomaston, Vernon, Statewide
Related Search Terms
Map, Geography, Communities, Local History, Architecture, Landmarks, Insurance
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3 – Connecticut & Local History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

Why do our communities look the way they do today?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS

In what ways has our community’s past shaped how it looks today?

How has geography affected our community over time?

How have science, technology, and innovation affected communities?

D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

An example of a Sanborn map titled Insurance maps of Danbury, Fairfield County, Connecticut by the Sanborn Map Company, 1904 -
An example of a Sanborn map titled Insurance maps of Danbury, Fairfield County, Connecticut by the Sanborn Map Company, 1904 – Yale University, Sterling Memorial Library, Connecticut Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps

Use the Yale University Library website–Connecticut Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps— to select and download a Sanborn fire insurance map to fit your teaching goals (you can look at the maps in your browser, but downloading the high-quality PDFs will enable students to make out more details).

You may choose just one map from your town or a nearby town, if you wish to focus on your own community, or select a few maps to show different types of environments—large cities, medium-sized towns, or smaller towns—if your focus is on urban, suburban, and rural communities. Note that many (but not all) Connecticut towns are represented in Sanborn maps. Here are a few samples from around the state:

Sanborn fire insurance maps were first published in 1867 to show how great a risk of fire there was in any town or city. The maps include all of the buildings in town, colored-coded to show what materials were used to build them (mostly “frame”/wood, brick, or stone). The maps also include important public buildings (government buildings, theaters, churches, schools, etc.), street names, and additional information. For larger cities, the maps take up several pages, like an atlas. For some communities, they are the most detailed maps available from the late 1800s to early 1900s. They are a great source of information about the past for historians–young and old!

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Using the Library of Congress’s Primary Source Analysis process, give students time to examine each of the maps you have selected, and ask them to OBSERVE, REFLECT, and QUESTION. For larger towns, you may want to start with the “title page” and then also look at a downtown detail page and one from farther outside the city center.

  1.  Observe: What do you notice first? What information does the map provide? What geographic elements are included? Which way is north/south/east/west and how do you know? Are there words on the map?
  2. Reflect: What do you think was important to the people who made this map? Does the map give us any clues about the time in which it was made? If you are familiar with this town today, what is the same and what is different? Or how is the town shown in this map similar to or different from your own?
  3. Question: What does this map make you wonder?
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS
  1. Imagining they are cartographers/map-makers, students will think about their own town and develop a list of all of the special places (public buildings, landmarks, public spaces, etc.) that should be included in a new map of town.
  2. Students will try their hand at making a map using rulers and graph paper. Making a map of the classroom is an easy project to start with; if your room has floor tiles, students can use those to mark out the dimensions on the graph paper.
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Places to GO
Things to DO
Articles & Books to READ

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Grade 3 – Connecticut Whaling and Maritime History


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Business & Industry
Theme
Using Evidence to Learn About the Past
Town
Mystic, a village in the towns of Groton and Stonington, New London, Norwich, Stamford
Related Search Terms
Whaling, Natural Resources, Mystic Seaport
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3
– Connecticut & Local History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

How have Connecticut’s maritime products and industries contributed to the history of America?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • How have Connecticut’s natural resources influenced the development of our state and its contribution to American history?
  • How did industries such as whaling, manufacturing, and technology create Connecticut’s history and contribute to America’s story?
  • Historically, what goods made in Connecticut have we traded elsewhere?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

right whale 1
Cutting in a right whale: View 1 – Mystic Seaport for Educators
right whale 2
Cutting in a right whale: View 2 -The Cutting In Stage – Mystic Seaport for Educators
right whale 3
Cutting in a right whale: View 3 – Hoisting the Head Mystic Seaport for Educators

This series of photographs were taken in 1903. They document the harvesting, cutting, and hoisting aboard of parts of a right whale onto the whaling bark the California. From these photographs we see the importance of the ship and the sailors as valuable resources in the whaling process, as well as the whale oil and baleen being harvested.

Shipping, shipbuilding, and whaling play a large role in New England and Connecticut history, helping to spark the Industrial Revolution in New England.

New Bedford became known as “The City That Lit the World,” and New London was the third-largest whale oil port in the United States. The whaling industry also depopulated whales in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

In small groups, ask students to closely examine the series of three pictures and discuss:

  • What is happening in the photographs?
  • How can they tell? What do they see? Where is the evidence?

The pictures are a series showing a right whale being taken from the Atlantic Ocean and harvested for its resources.

Have students in groups discuss and research as necessary:

  • What is being gained from this harvest?
  • What are the valuable resources in the pictures?
  • What effect do these Connecticut sailors and the whaling industry have on the rest of the country?
  • How did Connecticut’s contribution to the whaling industry affect the way the world viewed America at the time?
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

In groups, have students design a new flag for the state of Connecticut to reflect our maritime history, and present their new flag to the class explaining and justifying each of the elements they included on the flag.

  • Identify each symbol or design included on the flag.
  • What is the significance of each element?
  • Why did they choose to include these particular symbols?
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ

Grade 3 – Account Book of James Stewart’s General Store

by Gigi Liverant 
Colchester Historical Society, Colchester


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Business & Industry, Everyday Life
Theme
Using Evidence to Learn About the Past
Town
Colchester, Statewide
Related Search Terms
Primary Source, James Stewart, Colchester, Colonist, Bulkeley, Caleb Pendleton, Reverend M. Worthington, Colonial, Everyday Life, Trade
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3 – Connecticut & Local History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

How do we trade goods and services?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • How do we get things we need to live?
  • What resources were available in Colchester?
  • How was colonial life different/similar to life now?
  • How does Colchester contribute to Connecticut’s story?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

A sampler of pages from the account book of James Stewart’s general store located in Colchester, Connecticut, 1740 and continues through 1769.

DavidFoote
Ledger page 42, dated 1740, Account of “David Foot of Colchester”, also “Seth Wetmore of Middletown.” Items entered on ledger page include; “Sundrys”, “Silk Hanky”, and “Cash paid him at Hartford page” – Colchester Historical Society
FreedomChamberlain

Ledger page 31, dated 1740. Account of “Freedom Chamberlain of Colchester” indicating the purchase of “brimstone”, “knitting needles”, “beaver hat”, “broom”, “2 knives & forks” and “22 apple trees” – Colchester Historical Society
D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Using close-reading of the documents, have students generate a list of items one would purchase at James Stewart’s general store. Have the list shared among the students as each page contains different items.

  • How did people get to the general store?
  • What is the difference between these lists and their family shopping list?
  • What kind of currency are they using?
  • What are “sundry?”
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

Determine the differences between the credit and barter accounts. Ask students to give modern-day examples of credit and bartering in daily life. Where in their school do they make decisions like this?

Have a class simulation where students are given different “commodities” to trade or barter. Have four students sit out and each of these students represent a town commodity, such as, beaver hats, jack knives, sewing silk, or cotton handkerchiefs. One person can be the store owner. What would they trade or barter to get these new products? How would the store owner acquire new products?

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ

Grade 3 – Economic Development: Saugatuck’s Development Over Time

by Lauren Francese
Westport Public Schools, Westport


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Arts, Business & Industry, Transportation
Theme
Influence of Geography on the Social, Political, and Economic Development of CT Towns and the State
Town
Westport, Statewide
Related Search Terms
Westport, Progress, Transportation, Art, Lambdin
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3 – Connecticut & Local History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

In what ways has one town, and Connecticut, changed and/or stayed the same over time?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • In what ways have bodies of water shaped the development of Connecticut over time?
  • What has motivated innovations in transportation throughout Connecticut’s history?
  • How does an artist tell a story?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

Saugatuck in the 19th Century by Robert Lambdin - Westport Public Schools
Saugatuck in the 19th Century by Robert Lambdin – Westport Public Schools

This painting is titled, “Saugatuck in the 19th Century.” It depicts Saugatuck as part of Connecticut river commerce and manufacturing. The artist, Robert Lambdin, was a Westport resident who created the mural for the Westport Bank & Trust Company’s Saugatuck branch when it opened in 1970.

It shows the various types of transportation and methods of trade that developed throughout the 19th century. A few of the landmarks in the painting are still standing today, including the original firehouse and the swing bridge and train depot.

While the painting emphasizes the 19th century, the artist included I-95, which was a 20th-century development. However, the framing of the mural with the I-95 overpass creates an interesting dynamic within the mural as a way to think about economic progress.MuralLegendPicture

-Legend for Mural copy

This is a legend for the mural to show the locations represented.

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Introduce the painting and ask students to SEE, THINK, WONDER.

  • What do they SEE in the mural?
  • What does this mural make them THINK about?
  • What does this mural make them WONDER?

SEE: Make observations about the mural.
THINK: Make connections using background knowledge.
WONDER: Ask questions about the mural.

Introduce “economics” and vocabulary terms: buyers, sellers, and trade.
WHO TRADES? (nearly everyone)
PEOPLE TRADE BECAUSE… (people trade because they expect to gain)
PEOPLE MAKE CHOICES ABOUT TRADING BASED ON… (what they want, want more, or don’t want at all)

What questions from the list of things you wondered might help us to explore the economic activity/trade in the mural? (Students can work here to identify and prioritize questions)

Who is trading in the mural? What is being traded? What different types of transportation are people using to trade?

What questions would they ask the artist to better understand the mural? How might we find clues or helpful information to learn more about the message within this mural?


 

Research the Art! What time periods are reflected in the painting? Assign students to research the following modes of transportation or industries that are represented in the painting (inquiry circles may be used here too). Have students place these innovations on a timeline in the classroom.

  • Sailing Vessel
  • Steamboat
  • Railroad
  • Horse and carriage
  • Highways
  • Bank
  • Button Making
  • Saugatuck Manufacturing
  • Doscher Plane Company
  • Wakeman Mattress and Cushion Company
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

In groups, have students create a new title for the painting and explain their rationale for the title. Then, ask students to add to the timeline of transportation (what comes next?) and make predictions about how they would change the painting to reflect their ideas about the future.

  • Why did they choose this title?
  • Why is this painting important for understanding how Westport and other Connecticut communities changed over time?
  • How will the changes they predict for the future of transportation shape the way people live in Westport and other Connecticut communities?

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ

Grade 3 – Kids at Sea in the 19th Century

by Laura Krenicki
William J. Johnston Middle School, Colchester


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Transportation, Exploration & Discovery
Theme
Influence of Geography on the Social, Political, and Economic Development of CT Towns and the State
Town
Mystic, a village in the towns of Groton and Stonington, Statewide
Related Search Terms
19th Century, Life at Sea, Maud Maxon, Letter, Education, Ship, Primary Source, Everyday Life
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3 – Connecticut & Local History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

How did maritime culture influence the people of Connecticut?

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • How was life in the 1870s similar or different to life in Connecticut now?
  • How has transportation improved since 1870?
  • What would it have been like for children at sea?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson.

Maud Maxon was a little girl in Mystic, Connecticut, who went on a ship voyage with her uncle. Her mother did not go on the trip, so the letter tells her mother of her days at sea. Page one of letter. - Mystic Seaport
Maud Maxon was a little girl in Mystic, Connecticut, who went on a ship voyage with her uncle. Her mother did not go on the trip, so the letter tells her mother of her days at sea. Page one of letter. – Mystic Seaport
Page 2 of letter. - Mystic Seaport
Page 2 of letter. There are more pages available on the Mystic Seaport link. – Mystic Seaport
Page 3 of letter. - Mystic Seaport
Page 3 of letter. There are more pages available on the Mystic Seaport link. – Mystic Seaport
D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Divide students into small groups and have them read the first page of the letter (if it is difficult to read, click on the Mystic Seaport link as there is a “transcription” of the text as well as an audio version at the top of the page). Have students write questions about the letter on sticky notes. Continue with the next page and see if any of the questions on the sticky notes were answered. Remove those notes. Add new notes as additional questions are raised, etc.

Explore the questions and see if some are answerable with the letter itself. If not, have students research what life at sea would have been like, and even more so for children. Also consider the routes one would need to take in the 19th century to go from Mystic, Connecticut, to San Francisco, California.

D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS
  • Students may create their own letters as though they were aboard a ship, and use examples/terms from the Artifact Resource Sets found on the Mystic Seaport website. For example: “although it is often very dark in the bunks where we sleep, the DECK LIGHTS set in the upper deck allows for some light to the lower deck.”
  • Create a map of the sea routes one would take to travel from Mystic, Connecticut, to San Francisco, California, in the 19th century. Would there be a faster sea route now?
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Places to GO
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ

Grade 3 – Hartford: Then and Now

Map of Pioneer Hartford produced in 1927

by Laura Krenicki
William J. Johnston Middle School, Colchester


TEACHER'S SNAPSHOT
Topic
Environment, Exploration and Discovery
Theme
Influence of Geography on the Social, Political, and Economic Development of CT Towns and the State
Town
Hartford, Statewide
Related Search Terms
Colonial, Hartford, Map, Pequot, Pioneer, Geography, Local History
Social Studies Frameworks
Grade 3 – Connecticut & Local History
D1: POTENTIAL COMPELLING QUESTION

In what ways has Hartford, Connecticut, changed and/or stayed the same over time? 

D1: POTENTIAL SUPPORTING QUESTIONS
  • How were local landmarks and neighborhoods named?
  • Why were specific individuals in your community honored through monuments or memorials, and how did they affect the history of your town, state, and country?
  • What historical events occurred in your town/city?
D2: TOOL KIT

Things you will need to teach this lesson (click on map for larger image).

The Map of Pioneer Hartford: Founded 1636, Incorporated 1784, Showing Early Landmarks and the Locations of Historical Events, ca. 1927 by James and Ruth Goldie - Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division
“The Map of Pioneer Hartford: Founded 1636, Incorporated 1784, Showing Early Landmarks and the Locations of Historical Events”, ca. 1927 by James and Ruth Goldie – Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division

The Map of Pioneer Hartford

Hartford, named after the English town of Hertford, was established in 1636. Though Rev. Thomas Hooker is credited with starting the English colony, there was already a Dutch settlement and Native American settlements in the same region. In fact, the state name Connecticut originates from the Mohegan word quonehtacut, meaning “place of long tidal river,” which runs alongside Hartford. This colonial map of Hartford shows how different cartographers (map makers) view space and place. Here, you’ll notice there are few streets, but there are landmarks and family names.

"Hartford Settlement, 1636" map created from two separate maps, originally published in The Colonial History of Hartford by Rev. William DeLoss Love, 1811, on the website Kenyon Street: Hartford's West End.
“Hartford Settlement, 1636” map created from two separate maps, originally published in The Colonial History of Hartford by Rev. William DeLoss Love, 1811, on the website Kenyon Street: Hartford’s West End.

Hartford Settlement, 1636

There are several Native American references on the map. Can your students spot them all? Several groups of Native Peoples lived in the Hartford area, and they have a strong cultural heritage in our state (For more info: Pequot Museum). In fact, many Native Peoples died when Europeans settled in the area because of exposure to new diseases. Using the CDC.gov website, have students find areas of the world requiring immunizations for travelers. Why are immunizations important?

University of Connecticut's, Map and Geographic Information Center - Hartford, CT Historical Places Map Mash-up
University of Connecticut’s, Map and Geographic Information Center – Hartford, CT: Historical Places Map Mash-up

Mash-up map

Over time, more maps were made of Hartford and more details were added as the community grew larger. In the upper left corner of the map is a drop-down menu. Choose one of the maps in the drop-down menu to compare to the map listed above. What questions do you have about the two maps? For more information, you may wish to check out this website: Map of the Week! #3 Hartford in 1640 and 1893

D3: INQUIRY ACTIVITY

Have students notice how the map is oriented.

  • Which way is north?
  • How can they tell?
  • Which way does the Connecticut River flow?

The founding of Hartford was dependent on the Connecticut River.

  • Why was the river so important then?
  • How is it important to Hartford now?

For further consideration:

  • How important is scale on a map?
  • If they were to use this Pioneer Map of Hartford, how close would things seem?
  • How might this be misleading if students were going to walk from Soldier’s Field to West Field?
  • How did these places get their names?
D4: COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS

Have students create a personal map from their house to your school. Have students ask their families to see how their community has changed over time.

As a class discussion, consider these questions:

  • What things would you think are important to include in your map?
  • What details or landmarks would you include in your map and what would you leave off?
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Places to GO
Things to DO
Websites to VISIT
Articles to READ